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Soft Despotism, Democracy's Drift: Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and the Modern Prospect #2020

Soft Despotism Democracy s Drift Montesquieu Rousseau Tocqueville and the Modern Prospect In the Cold War abruptly ended and it seemed as if the world was at last safe for democracy But a spirit of uneasiness discontent and world weariness soon arose and has persisted in Europe in

  • Title: Soft Despotism, Democracy's Drift: Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and the Modern Prospect
  • Author: Paul Anthony Rahe
  • ISBN: 9780300144925
  • Page: 473
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Soft Despotism, Democracy's Drift: Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and the Modern Prospect By Paul Anthony Rahe, In 1989, the Cold War abruptly ended and it seemed as if the world was at last safe for democracy But a spirit of uneasiness, discontent, and world weariness soon arose and has persisted in Europe, in America, and elsewhere for two decades To discern the meaning of this malaise we must investigate the nature of liberal democracy, says the author of this provocative book,In 1989, the Cold War abruptly ended and it seemed as if the world was at last safe for democracy But a spirit of uneasiness, discontent, and world weariness soon arose and has persisted in Europe, in America, and elsewhere for two decades To discern the meaning of this malaise we must investigate the nature of liberal democracy, says the author of this provocative book, and he undertakes to do so through a detailed investigation of the thinking of Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Tocqueville.Paul A Rahe argues that these political thinkers anticipated the modern liberal republic s propensity to drift in the direction of soft despotism a condition that arises within a democracy when paternalistic state power expands and gradually undermines the spirit of self government Such an eventuality, feared by Tocqueville in the nineteenth century, has now become a reality throughout the European Union, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the United States So Rahe asserts, and he explains what must be done to reverse this unfortunate trend.

    • UNLIMITED AUDIOBOOK ☆ Soft Despotism, Democracy's Drift: Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and the Modern Prospect - by Paul Anthony Rahe
      473 Paul Anthony Rahe
    • thumbnail Title: UNLIMITED AUDIOBOOK ☆ Soft Despotism, Democracy's Drift: Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and the Modern Prospect - by Paul Anthony Rahe
      Posted by:Paul Anthony Rahe
      Published :2019-09-05T07:45:10+00:00

    1 thought on “Soft Despotism, Democracy's Drift: Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and the Modern Prospect

    1. I m giving this a four star rating, but I want to say that it is not an easy read At times this can be very dry going The book is written in a scholarly manner that lays out ideas in a detailed and incremental manner The ideas in this book and their importance are undeniable, but you need to wade through a lot of examples and historical facts to get there Now this isn t bad but it can take some staying powerI laid it aside than once.I was already familiar with the work of Tocqueville and Pascal [...]

    2. Rahe is fantastically learned, and writes cogently and well The material is dense, but well worth wading through If you want to know the historical lineage of our drift into administrative despotism, this is the book.

    3. Really enjoyed this one Would have preferred analysis of Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Tocqueville s work in contrast to our modern society First 3 4ths of the book cover the political thought of those three, scholarly reading though not too dense My recent background in the work of all three men helped Not impossible for a beginner, though When he compares mainly Tocqueville s political writing to our current cultural predicament, certainly a strong position familiar to many on the Right but wort [...]

    4. Excellent He lays a solid foundation in the first two thirds of the book The last several chapters are hard hitting indictments on the welfare state.

    5. Great book on the dangers that democracy hold for a society the death of liberty by a thousand cuts from an overly administrative centralizing state.

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