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Feeling Very Strange: The Slipstream Anthology #2020

Feeling Very Strange The Slipstream Anthology If it is true that the test of a first rate mind is its ability to hold two contradictory ideas at the same time then we live in a century when it takes a first rate mind just to get through the day

  • Title: Feeling Very Strange: The Slipstream Anthology
  • Author: James Patrick Kelly John Kessel Karen Joy Fowler Jeffrey Ford Benjamin Rosenbaum Michael Chabon Theodora Goss Howard Waldrop
  • ISBN: 9781892391353
  • Page: 343
  • Format: Paperback
  • Feeling Very Strange: The Slipstream Anthology By James Patrick Kelly John Kessel Karen Joy Fowler Jeffrey Ford Benjamin Rosenbaum Michael Chabon Theodora Goss Howard Waldrop, If it is true that the test of a first rate mind is its ability to hold two contradictory ideas at the same time, then we live in a century when it takes a first rate mind just to get through the day We have unprecedented access to information cognitive dissonance is a banner headline in our morning papers and radiates silently from our computer screens Slipstream, poisIf it is true that the test of a first rate mind is its ability to hold two contradictory ideas at the same time, then we live in a century when it takes a first rate mind just to get through the day We have unprecedented access to information cognitive dissonance is a banner headline in our morning papers and radiates silently from our computer screens Slipstream, poised between literature and popular culture, embraces the dissonance These ambitious stories of visionary strangeness defy the conventions of science fiction Tales by Michael Chabon, Karen Joy Fowler, Jonathan Lethem, Carol Emshwiller, George Saunders, and others pull the reader into a vivid dreamspace and embrace the knowledge that life today is increasingly surreal ContentsIntroduction by John Kessel and Jim Patrick Kelly Al by Carol Emshwiller The Little Magic Shop by Bruce Sterling The Healer by Aimee Bender The Specialist s Hat by Kelly Link Light and the Sufferer by Jonathan Lethem Sea Oak by George Saunders Exhibit H Torn Pages Discovered in the Vest Pocket of an Unidentified Tourist by Jeff VanderMeer Hell is the Absence of God by Ted Chiang Lieserl by Karen Joy Fowler Bright Morning by Jeffrey Ford Biographical Notes to A Discourse on the Nature of Causality, with Air planes by Benjamin Rosenbaum The God of Dark Laughter by Michael Chabon The Rose in Twelve Petals by Theodora Goss The Lions Are Asleep This Night by Howard Waldrop You Have Never Been Here by M Rickert I Want My 20th Century Schizoid Art I IV various contributors

    • READ AUDIOBOOK ☆ Feeling Very Strange: The Slipstream Anthology - by James Patrick Kelly John Kessel Karen Joy Fowler Jeffrey Ford Benjamin Rosenbaum Michael Chabon Theodora Goss Howard Waldrop
      James Patrick Kelly John Kessel Karen Joy Fowler Jeffrey Ford Benjamin Rosenbaum Michael Chabon Theodora Goss Howard Waldrop

    1 thought on “Feeling Very Strange: The Slipstream Anthology

    1. Hmm I ll admit my interest in this book was mostly academic, since it was suggested to me recently that my short stories fall into the category slipstream Having never heard the term I was excited to finally have a genre for my shit, and quickly started parroting it to anyone who asked me what my writing was like it s like, um, slipstream Had I actually read anything in my supposed genre No, of course not Not until I came by this book by accident in the library three weeks agoHere s what I think [...]

    2. Feeling Very Strange contains some of the best short stories I have read Many of them, Hell is the Absence of God in particular, left me with a peculiar emotional philosophical wistfulness that I quite enjoyed.Slipstream is a genre attempting to make itself exist Sort of a chicken egg time travel paradox Slipstream is not sci fi, maybe fantasy, is definitely fiction, and is also a bit strange The people that obsess about such things are only those who use not only setting, but purpose to define [...]

    3. A variety of good stories whose variety actually underscores the fact that slipstream fiction isn t exactly a genre The anthology also includes an interesting discussion about the nature of slipstream writing and what constitutes making one feel strange.

    4. This book so nearly has five stars Four and a half.The stories Light and the Sufferer by Jonathan Lethem and The God of Dark Laughter by Michael Chabon are each worth the price of admission The interstitial ruminations by selected authors on the genre blurring and mind bending of this hotly contested subgenre were very useful to me as a writer Borges meets scifi which is what the back says, is just too limited and vague.Here s my attempt to explain it, with help from the writers in the book Some [...]

    5. I just discovered that slipstream is the name of the type of story I ve always loved one that is rooted in a regular world, but in which strange and unreal elements appear I like it much better than straight fantasy or regular reality This collection has some great stories in it, and, as is the case with this weird kind of writing, some I don t like as much, but that s okay I loved the story by Ted Chiang, Jeffrey Ford, George Saunders I always love him and Bruce Sterling If you are a fan of wei [...]

    6. Ironically, my only real complaint about this book is the concept behind it I m not sure that the term slipstream coined by sf writer Bruce Sterling to describe superficially mainstream literary works that nonetheless incorporate genre elements is really a useful or even meaningful term For the most part works described as such seem to end up being defined by what they aren t than what they are science fiction whose scientific aspects are nonsensical or only tangential to the plot, fantasy whos [...]

    7. It seems fitting that I attempt to write a review while in an allergy stupor because slipstream stories can sometimes make me feel like my head s in a fog and I m looking at the world through a haze I learned of this sub genre only a couple of years ago at an ICFA where I got the lovely Jim Kelly to sign the bookI have no idea why I didn t nab John Kessel for his signature too The intro by the editors, Kelly and Kessel, alone is worth the price of the volume, in my opinion, but there many gems i [...]

    8. A few good stories in here nothing new or groundbreaking Initially sceptical when the introduction starts telling what emotions and themes i should be feeling for each story rather then let me do it for myself Also the rather confused and irritating definition of the term slipstream which is made even annoying by the continued documentation of the writers and editors pretentious correspondence with each other over the label and genre of slipstream which some rightly in my opinion state that it [...]

    9. This anthology isn t really a cohesive whole, and that s a good thing The stories contained within are supposedly from a newish genre called slipstream According to Bruce Sterling, slipstream s unifying force is cognitive dissonance What this anthology demonstrated is that Slipstream isn t a genre at all, and that s there nothing new about it It is, in fact, anti genre, and a demonstration of how some our great young writers don t give a damn about genre boundaries Much of the fiction here felt [...]

    10. Despite Kelly and Kessel s introduction, I m still not sure what the slipstream genre is or if it even exists, but I did find several notable stories in this collection All of the stories were good, but these were hauntingly memorable Light and the SuffererJohnathan LethemAliens in science fiction are often cast at extremes of predation or benevolence, but this story seems to ask, What if aliens arrive and they just aren t much use I was pleased to see this has been made into a film.Sea OakGeorg [...]

    11. This is a solid anthology that invites critical discussion I ve actually seen several of these stories before, in various collections It s interesting to see them in this editorial context, and to think about what they may or may not have in common.

    12. I nearly gave this 4 stars, but going back through and averaging my ratings for each story, I came out closer to 3.5 stars All the stories have some interesting, inventive features, but like so many anthologies, it is a bit of a mixed bag and only a few of the stories really stand out.As far as the effort to lock in on a definition of slipstream, Kelly and Kessel stumble around in their introduction consciously so And this effort is made a focus in subsequent sections featuring text from an onli [...]

    13. This is a very fuzzy collection It opens with an essay about how hard it is to pin down Slipstream as a genre or sub genre, and later intersperses conversations between Slipstream authors about what the heck it is If Slipstream really is the genre of stories that make you feel strange, then arguing over its boundaries is utterly futile, because like Horror being the genre that makes you scared, what does it for one person does nothing for others Eventually we defined Horror as whatever looks lik [...]

    14. A Most Compelling Slipstream Short Story CollectionSlipstream exists between the interstices of fantasy and domestic realism not quite fantasy, not quite domestic reality literary fiction, but one in which its adherents understand the importance of adding aspects of realism to a broad literary canvas of fantasy and science fiction, while adhering quite loosely to the time honored conventions of these genre fiction tropes Noted science fiction writers and editors James Patrick Kelly and John Kess [...]

    15. Though some of the stories lost my interest, as a whole it was very nice collection I especially liked the sections that have reprinted blog posts discussing the debate of slipstream s definition as a genre I can t say I completely understand what slipstream is and is not from reading this book, however, the variety of short fictions compiled gave me at least a smidgen of an idea Leaning on my own personal tastes, I found many of the stories included to be delightful reads Hell is the Absence of [...]

    16. The anthology contains some critical discussion regarding the nature of slipstream literature by the editors and contributors, and the following fiction Al, Carol Emschwiller The Little Magic Shop, Bruce Sterling The Healer, Aimee Bender The Specialist s Hat, Kelly Link Light and the Sufferer, Jonathan Lethem Sea Oak, George Saunders Exihibit H Torn Pages Discovered in the Vest Pocket of an Unidentified Tourist, Jeff VanderMeer Hell is the Absence of God, Ted Chiang Lieserl, Karen Joy Fowler Bri [...]

    17. Another step along my search for an elusive kind of reading If you have ever read anything that sounds like how they describe slipstream in the intro, and wanted , I think you will find something to like here In fact, if you have ever grasped at thin air for words to describe that particular brand of fiction, not quite definable by genre tropes but by the feeling it left in you, the pages and pages of reprinted dialogues between writers attempting to give it just such a definition will at least [...]

    18. Slipstream as a literary genre is hard to define Even its greatest advocates, and the authors who purport to be writing within its scope have a hard time agreeing what it is all about While it is generally accepted to be a sub genre of science fiction, beyond that opinions as to its basic nature diverge It certainly has elements of magic realism And while this anthology might not get us any closer to settling the debate, it provides some damn fine reading A diverse and thought provoking collecti [...]

    19. This was great Some of it was absolutely 5 stars, but I wasn t entirely in love with all of it The record of the running blog conversations between authors about what really is slipstream, or rather Infernokrusher, was wonderful though I may be biased on that account because in my student teaching I am working on getting kids to have that kind of conversation and writing where they examine different people s ideas All of the stories have a weirdness to them, though it is often a weirdness unique [...]

    20. Is there really any difference between post modernism, interstitial fiction, slipstream and New Weird Does anyone know James Patrick Kelly and John Kessel try to outline the boundaries of slipstream with their anthology, Feeling Very Strange The Slipstream Anthology, particularly by including a learned introduction and excerpts from a discussion that took place on the subject on a blog a few years ago Ultimately, like so many things literary, from science fiction to erotica, it comes down to thi [...]

    21. As I ve found with most anthologies, there were stories I liked and some I didn t like The quality of the writing was high throughout, it s just that a few of the stories didn t drag me in or keep me interested My favorites were Sea Oak by George Saunders, Exhibit H by Jeff VanderMeer, The God of Dark Laughter by Michael Chabon, and The Rose in Twelve Petals by Theodora Goss I was particularly intrigued by the discussion of the genre of slipstream that occurs throughout the book Bruce Sterling, [...]

    22. Excellent collection of short stories Even the worst ones would rank as quite good As far as the discussion on what is slipstream I m sure no one really needs my 2 pennies worth on it, but for me only the first story, Al by Carol Emshwiller, embodied the concept of cognitive disonance story read as if you were listeing to a radio tuned between two stations Then again I felt that this cool effect was bit wasted on a satirical ditty Still, all pretty good My favourites Hell is the absence of God, [...]

    23. I would place slipstream as a genre somewhere at the triangulation of fantasy sf, alternative history, and magic realism Indeed, some filler material in this anthology consists of various blog commenters attempting to define the genre Aimee Bender, an author I always enjoy, is represented here I particularly liked Michael Chabon s The God of Dark Laughter and Benjamin Rosenbaum s Biographical Notes to A Discourse on the Nature of Causality, with Air Planes, by Benjamin Rosenbaum, which never rea [...]

    24. I give this 5 stars because I particularly like this genre of writing, or cross pollenated genre Anyone who enjoys a good dose of meta fiction or writerly fiction it feels inadequate to use these terms, but in the absence of widely known terms that are known to me, I ll use them mixed in with their sci fi fantasy should give this book a try In between the stories are exchanges about genres and the term slipstream by some of the contributors My favorite story in the collection is Michael Chabon s [...]

    25. Ranging from realism with a side of weird to metafiction with a dash of odd every story was uniquely enjoyable There were great ones from Kelly Link, Aimee Bender, Carol Emshwiller, George Saunders, Jeff VanderMeer, Michael Chabon, Theodora Goss, okay I feel like I m just recreating the content page but I loved nearly every story in the book unusual for me with an anthology My favorite was an exceptional angelic visitations cause random catastrophes and miracles in every day life story from Ted [...]

    26. So far each story has been absurdly satisfying The Saunders story included was one from CivilWarLand I believe and one of my favorites anyway, the one with the sisters Min and Jade But importantly, like, twelve writers aside from Saunders have their work highlighted in this collection and it manages to be exactly my style of surrealism, satire, politics, and mindfuck I ve only got like three left to read alas.

    27. I m no closer to understanding whether this is really a distinct genre or not, but this is an interesting collection.Worth it for The Healer, Aimee Bender The Specialist s Hat, Kelly Link Light and the Sufferer, Jonathan Lethem Sea Oak, George Saunders Hell is the Absence of God, Ted Chiang Bright Morning, Jeffrey Ford

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