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Anthology of Japanese Literature: From the Earliest Era to the Mid-Nineteenth Century #2019

Anthology of Japanese Literature From the Earliest Era to the Mid Nineteenth Century The sweep of Japanese literature in all its great variety was made available to Western readers for the first time in this anthology Every genre and style from the celebrated No plays to the poetry a

  • Title: Anthology of Japanese Literature: From the Earliest Era to the Mid-Nineteenth Century
  • Author: Donald Keene Ki no Tsurayuki Bashō Matsuo 松尾 芭蕉 Mukai Kyorai 向井 去来 Jippensha Ikku Chikamatsu Monzaemon
  • ISBN: 9780802150585
  • Page: 375
  • Format: Paperback
  • Anthology of Japanese Literature: From the Earliest Era to the Mid-Nineteenth Century By Donald Keene Ki no Tsurayuki Bashō Matsuo 松尾 芭蕉 Mukai Kyorai 向井 去来 Jippensha Ikku Chikamatsu Monzaemon, The sweep of Japanese literature in all its great variety was made available to Western readers for the first time in this anthology Every genre and style, from the celebrated No plays to the poetry and novels of the seventeenth century, find a place in this book An introduction by Donald Keene places the selections in their proper historical context, allowing the readerThe sweep of Japanese literature in all its great variety was made available to Western readers for the first time in this anthology Every genre and style, from the celebrated No plays to the poetry and novels of the seventeenth century, find a place in this book An introduction by Donald Keene places the selections in their proper historical context, allowing the readers to enjoy the book both as literature and as a guide to the cultural history of Japan Selections include Man yoshu or Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves from the ancient period Kokinshu or Collection of Ancient and Modern Poetry, The Tosa Diary of Ki No Tsurayuki, Yugao from Tales of Genji of Murasaki Shikibu, and The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon from the Heian Period The Tale of the Heike from the Kamakura Period Plan of the No Stage, Birds of Sorrow of Seami Motokiyo, and Three Poets at Minase from the Muromachi Period and Sections from Basho, including The Narrow Road of Oku, The Love Suicides at Sonezaki by Chikamatsu Monzaemon, and Waka and haiku of the Tokugawa Period.

    • [MOBI] ↠ Anthology of Japanese Literature: From the Earliest Era to the Mid-Nineteenth Century | By ↠ Donald Keene Ki no Tsurayuki Bashō Matsuo 松尾 芭蕉 Mukai Kyorai 向井 去来 Jippensha Ikku Chikamatsu Monzaemon
      375 Donald Keene Ki no Tsurayuki Bashō Matsuo 松尾 芭蕉 Mukai Kyorai 向井 去来 Jippensha Ikku Chikamatsu Monzaemon
    • thumbnail Title: [MOBI] ↠ Anthology of Japanese Literature: From the Earliest Era to the Mid-Nineteenth Century | By ↠ Donald Keene Ki no Tsurayuki Bashō Matsuo 松尾 芭蕉 Mukai Kyorai 向井 去来 Jippensha Ikku Chikamatsu Monzaemon
      Posted by:Donald Keene Ki no Tsurayuki Bashō Matsuo 松尾 芭蕉 Mukai Kyorai 向井 去来 Jippensha Ikku Chikamatsu Monzaemon
      Published :2019-09-21T19:55:23+00:00

    1 thought on “Anthology of Japanese Literature: From the Earliest Era to the Mid-Nineteenth Century

    1. Reading this five period anthology of Japanese literature is definitely rewarding if its readers get interested in knowing on some interesting selections translated from Japanese as compiled and edited by Donald Keene Some might not agree due to its incomplete excerpts but, I think, we need to be content with such an anthology since it s impossible to read all originals in Japanese Moreover, we can do that if we really know Japanese and can read all we want online via Project Gutenburg I tried [...]

    2. Only got to read a little bit while staying at a vacation rental with a thick stuffed bookshelf I pulled this down because I ve never sampled any old Japanese lit, and the editor s introduction drew me in with information like this the supreme masterpiece of Japanese literature was The Tale of Genji It is a work of genius, which may justifiably be included among the great novels of the world One of the unusual features of Heian can t read my note literature is that such work as The Tale of Genji [...]

    3. Mixing linguistic nuances and historical details with numerous stories, Donald Keene provides a strong editorial background to the translations of Japanese literature.When read carefully, the book also gives a translation of Donald Keene, highlighting his taste in poetry topics, love of Noh theater, and occasional annoyance with mono linguistic speakers he s got some footnotes where he simply says this is a pun, and its very clever on multiple levels, but would be much to tedious to explain here [...]

    4. Little Free Library find.Not everything interested me but a lot of the entries did I think contemporary translations might present a different interesting view.Very useful in a larger sense as reference and to have a better background understanding of references in Japanese film, anime and contemporary literate.Nothing to do with the book or my rating but prior owner underlined and notated relentlessly in ink which distracted me like crazy.

    5. This was a landmark anthology when published in the 1950s and is still, I think, regarded as standard reading on many university courses in pre modern Japanese literature Keene was, and still is, regarded as one of the leading Western authorities on, and translators of, Japanese literature many of these translations are his own His selections can, I think, be relied on to offer a representative birds eye view of Japanese literature from the earliest times right up to the end of the Tokugawa era [...]

    6. When it comes to Japanese literature Translation wise, there are three people that really stand out To me, at least Donald Keene, Edward G Seidensticker, and Arthur Waley.Maybe because my collection is mostly have them credited as a translator, so I m so well known with their style Their subtlety and minimum localization Yes, I despise localization Unless it s really necessary or the equivalent could capture the nuance of the original phrase.Anyway, this book is like the guide book for those who [...]

    7. Numerous enjoyable pieces, in this, my first exposure to ancient Japanese literature Floating Worlds , the letters of Edward Gorey, triggered my interest Some memorable excerpts 106Murasaki, 11th C, Tales of Genjiek not in the wide world to find a home but where you chance to rest, call that your house.232Kenko, 14th C, Essays in Idleness,when a man is over 40, it is pitiful to see, how, unashamed of his looks, he loves to thrust himself into the society of others.233There is a charm about a nea [...]

    8. Each literary piece reveals the nature and culture of these beautiful people The anthology has selections from all five periods of creative writing The most surprising news of all, many of the short stories were written by women In fact, the beautiful, well written plots enlightened one to the power of this peaceful aspect women are able to recreate Pride of the warrior has been important so women share the depth of emotion and pleasure in nature, death, belief, and living in the world of Japan [...]

    9. Throughout this book, my greatest challenge was trying to be understanding of the time and place in which this book was released It serves its purpose as an anthology, albeit a tad light for my tastes, and as a brief introduction to Japanese literature throughout history But I had a hard time with the fact that there were very few Japanese translators, mostly a bunch of old white academics, whom I daresay were without the cultural context of what many of these pieces were apart Which leads me to [...]

    10. I use this book in the classroom for two reasons it s relatively cheap 10 when most lit anthologies run 30 40 50 and the collection is well selected and well translated The only problem for which I docked it one star is that there s little in the way of explanatory notes, making it less accessible to the neophyte like my students.

    11. This is really an amazing collection I wouldn t necessarily have it around to reread, but it is great to read the excerpts and then chase down the source material that appeals I ve gone off and acquired several books as a result of reading the bits in here As usual, Donald Keene does not disappoint.

    12. This book is perfect for an introduction to Japanese literature It contains popular excerpts from the most notable works I highly suggest it only to be used as an introduction, because it only brushes the surface of the stories you read in this anthology.

    13. Well selected and explained by a person you would trust to this task.He s gone for representative rather than for western appeal and so you might find a lot of falling petals and moon gazing haikus which don t do much in English but at least you know what they were writing then Fascinating.

    14. Not bad at all, basically an introduction to Japanese literature I read this for one of my Japanese lit classes.

    15. Very good collection and a great introduction to ancient Japanese literature I particularly liked the inclusion of romanized Japanese in the poetry sections.

    16. Keene s collection has some of THE most essential works of Japanese literature A must read to anyone introducing themselves to Japanese works.

    17. Apakah orang Jepang menyukai Bai Juyi Ato kebetulan yg ditranslate yg banyak Bai Juyi nya Aaa jadi pengen baca Tale of Genji.

    18. Kokinshu was a lot of fun, and the diary of the woman in the Heian Court absolutely broke my heart but I feel that a lot of the work in this is restrictive w r t subject matter.

    19. This is the kind of book that i will not finish cover to cover at one time, and actually i can start from anywhere i want, be it page 1, or 160 Maybe I ll read a bit later.

    20. I read this book for class, but I really enjoyed it an valued the work of the writer to translate all of these culturally important Japanese works.

    21. Good place to start with Japanese literature it contains curated excerpts from classics like The Tale of Genji so the reader won t have to commit to the whole thing Many of the stories are heartbreaking all the lovers seem doomed and all the warriors seem to be fleeing a disaster The translations of the poetry here were my favorite part.

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