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L'uomo Mose e la religione monoteistica e altri scritti 1930-38 (Opere Vol 11) #2020

L uomo Mose e la religione monoteistica e altri scritti Opere Vol This volume contains Freud s speculations on various aspects of religion on the basis of which he explains certain characteristics of the Jewish people in their relations with the Christians From an

  • Title: L'uomo Mose e la religione monoteistica e altri scritti 1930-38 (Opere Vol 11)
  • Author: Sigmund Freud
  • ISBN: 9788833901152
  • Page: 183
  • Format: Hardcover
  • L'uomo Mose e la religione monoteistica e altri scritti 1930-38 (Opere Vol 11) By Sigmund Freud, This volume contains Freud s speculations on various aspects of religion, on the basis of which he explains certain characteristics of the Jewish people in their relations with the Christians From an intensive study of the Moses legend, Freud comes to the startling conclusion that Moses himself was an Egyptian who brought from his native country the religion he gave to thThis volume contains Freud s speculations on various aspects of religion, on the basis of which he explains certain characteristics of the Jewish people in their relations with the Christians From an intensive study of the Moses legend, Freud comes to the startling conclusion that Moses himself was an Egyptian who brought from his native country the religion he gave to the Jews He accepts the hypothesis that Moses was murdered in the wilderness, but that his memory was cherished by the people that his religious doctrine ultimately triumphed Freud develops his general theory of monotheism, which enables him to throw light on the development of Judaism Christianity.

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      Published :2020-04-19T22:51:52+00:00

    1 thought on “L'uomo Mose e la religione monoteistica e altri scritti 1930-38 (Opere Vol 11)

    1. Moses and Monotheism is Sigmund Freud s last book and was only published after his death It contains a concise summary and revision of his major theories but even importantly he expresses his true beliefs about the history of the Judeo Christian religions Freud believed that the origins of Judaism begin with the Egyptian heretic king Akhenaten He was so concerned about this premise that he believed he could be assassinated by the Catholic church I understand that many of Freud s teaching have b [...]

    2. In one of a couple of prefaces to Part II of this book, Freud explains why he will not publish it He is under the protection of Rome, so does not want to anger his hosts with Part II s argument that Christianity is a collective psychosis And he says this great thing, So I shall not publish this essay But that need not hinder me from writing it The so since it was written once before, two years ago, and thus only needs re writing and adding on to the two previous essays Thus it may lie hid until [...]

    3. This was an interesting little book that is partly a digression from Freud s larger ideological framework of the psychological development of religious belief Much of his deductions concerning the life and death of Moses were speculative, but Freud says as much, and openly confesses the stretch of imagination it takes to even attempt to restructure the Moses myth His only apologia for doing so the recreated story is far less fantastic than the traditional account Anyone who reads Freud s recasti [...]

    4. In our time, there seem to be a few ways of defining Jews in a world very largely of non Jews 1 As practitioners of one of the main world religions 2 As a people whose ethnicity was hit not long ago by genocidal European Holocaust 3 As Diaspora auxiliary or citizens of the state of Israel situated precariously among Muslim countries to one extent or another hostile to that state 4 As humans educated disproportionately to their global numbers 5 As workers disproportionately numbered in the global [...]

    5. Highly speculative re imagining of the Moses myth as well as a general account of primitive religions and the transition to a monotheistic platform I m not sure why Freud is concerned about Moses s race I would think most modern scholars reject the very existence of Moses Egypt, for a short period of time, had the Pharaoh Akhenaten who proclaimed that their existed one God This may have been an attempt to draw a similarity between God and his own rule That there is one god means that there shoul [...]

    6. I didn t put a number of stars on this review because, ironically, I don t have a single, uncomplex opinion of this book Freud, on the other hand, proposes his thesises with an absolute air of certainty that, unanalyzed, captures the reader and has her knodding her head Although, once you really look into his arguements, you see his proof is fragile and most of the time proof for his thesises ARE thesises he s conjured himself One of the footnotes actually begs the reader not to look fully into [...]

    7. 1.This book is stylistically genius, who else could get away with saying No other people of the eastern Mediterranean besides the Egyptians , as far as we know, has followed this custom we can assume with certainty that the Semites, Babylonians, and Sumerians were not circumcisedIf Moses gave the news not only a new religion, but also the law of circumision, he was no Jew, but an Egyptian, and then the Mosaic religion was probably an Egyptian one But actually Freud s psychoanalysis of the relati [...]

    8. It was, I think, Christopher Lasch who summed up Freud especially in this book best as a clinician working with individuals, Freud gave us some startling and significant insights we should still, rightly, pay attention to but as a culture theorist analyzing religion, Freud was totally out of his depth and can and should therefore be ignored Exactly right.

    9. This book is amazing to me, because I love learning about the origins of religion, and I never knew that Freud thought religion was just a mass neurosis, which pleased me to no end.

    10. Moses and Monotheism Never heard of it well you should add this ingenious and obscure book to your library, written by the father of psychoanalysis, it ll whisk you away to the sands of Ancient Egypt and the self styled sun king Akhenaten, haven t heard of him either well you will have heard of his beautiful wife Nefertiti and of his even famous son Tutankhamun.Freud explores the original hypothesis that Akhenaten was in fact Moses, and Moses became the first monotheist, primarily devoted to th [...]

    11. An unintentionally amusing attempt to explain away the religion in which Freud was raised He fails spectacularly, owing mostly to the emotional basis for his enterprise, but also to his decision to pick and choose the historical, linguistic and sociological bits which best supported his theories Sadly, the existence of an invisible, all powerful creator god is MORE plausible than the pseudo historical narratives he creates Still, it s a quick read and very interesting, mostly because of the insi [...]

    12. I took my first course on psychoanalytic theory and its history from Ann Bedford Ulanov, an analytical psychologist, at UTS I d already read a bunch of Freud before and this was the most fun of the lot The assigned readings in this and later courses were much less interesting than the suggested additional readings wherein Freud indulged in various enthusiasms f.i cocaine and sociological Totem Taboo and religious speculations as in his last work on the origins of Judaism.Moses and Monotheism is [...]

    13. In his later life, Freud turned to anthropology Totem and Taboo and Moses and Monotheism complete a cycle that applied psychoanalysis to human history MM is two essays one written before he left Vienna, the second after he left and is therefore repetitive Confusingly, Freud does not always credit his sources This is a serious oversight, as most of his information comes from other scholars His attempt to use the psychoanalysis of the family to understand the history of the Jewish people ultimatel [...]

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